Why Strength Training is Good for Endurance Athletes

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Endurance

When we talk to endurance athletes, about strength training we often get the same response. These athletes don’t want to take time away from practising one of their disciplines. They wonder how they are going to add to their full training schedule.


Endurance athletes tend to avoid lifting weights. The common thought is that time in the gym will result in gaining muscle which will only slow them down. Research has shown that strength training is necessary for endurance athletes.

Endurance

Strength Training Increases Strength and Power

Endurance athletes spend a lot of time practising their disciple so they need to stay injury-free. Strength training strengthens more than muscles. Ligaments and tendons get strengthened and new neural pathways get created. All this keeps athletes injury-free and training consistency.

Endurance athletes thrive as strength and power get combined through explosive heavy lifting. This is because the combination leads to an improvement in the energy cost of locomotion. This combination also leads to maximising strength and power. Add more weight and do fewer repetitions to increase your efficiency and resilience.

Strength Training Improves Endurance Athlete’s Resilience

Resilience is important to go faster for longer without your body taking any strain. Weight training does exactly that. Weight training also improves collagen production and bone density.

To benefit fully from weight training you need to know when to train. It’s important to first prepare your body for the increased load by working on mobility. It’s also good to start during your base building season where you’re volume is low.

Mobility

Once there has been an improvement in your mobility then you can start increasing your weight. This is also the time to focus on your weaknesses. Cyclists for example should spend time building their upper body. This will enable them to not loose form on longer rides. Core work is also very important for this. Your core muscles give you balance and help you develop your primary muscles.

Strength training shouldn’t be an afterthought for endurance athletes. This is because strength training makes athletes strong, injury resistant, and mentally prepared. Our ENDR class is designed to help increase strength and power as well as build resilience.

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